Science

Wave Bottles

Isaiah and I made a couple of wave bottles tonight. The goal was to make one that glowed under a black light. Our first one did not, so we made a second.

Wave Bottles

Well shaken wave bottle

Instructions

supplies
Empty plastic bottle
Water
Highlighter (make sure it’s fluorescent)
Oil (we used baby oil)
Confetti

Wave Bottles

Supplies for Bottle #1

Take apart the highlighter and put the foamy ink cartridge out. Put it into the water to soak. You can squeeze it to make the ink come out faster, but beware–you may end up with dyed fingers. I used a fork to press the ink out, though I still ended up with some on my hands. Isaiah even, somehow, managed to get it on his face. Once the water has a good bit of ink in it, take the foam out and throw it away. Pour the water into the water bottle, filling it about two thirds of the way. Drop in a bit of confetti and top off the bottle with oil. Hot glue the lid on and you’re ready to play.

Wave Bottles

Soaking the ink

Wave Bottles

Finished bottle

As I said, our first bottle didn’t work. My pink highlighter (Isaiah’s color of choice this week) wasn’t fluorescent. Oops. We also didn’t put any confetti in that bottle. It still makes an awesome wave bottle. The color from the highlighter looks really nice and very different from what we would have gotten with food coloring.

Wave Bottles

Isaiah says it makes really good waves

Wave Bottles

Waves

For our second bottle, we used a yellow highlighter. We tested it with the black light before pulling it apart to be sure it would glow. I let Isaiah put some confetti into this bottle, which he was pretty excited about. Then I turned him loose to try it with the black light. My dad propped it up against the side of the tv so that Isaiah could do whatever he wanted with his bottle, without someone having to hold the light the entire time. Isaiah raced back and forth, putting the bottle in front of the light, then moving away for quite a while. He decided to test a few other things under the black light, too.

Wave Bottles

Looking through the glowing bottle

Wave Bottles

Floating confetti

Glowing Boy

My glowing boy

Categories: Crafts, Homeschool, Making Sensory Toys, Science, Sensory Bottles, Sensory Processing Disorder | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Lesson Plan: Colors and Mixing Them

Topic: Colors and Mixing Them

Books: Mouse Paint

Objectives
•Learn the primary colors (red, blue, yellow)
•Learn how to make secondary colors (mix two primaries)
•Make predictions about what happens when mixing two colors
Vocabulary
•Primary color—a color that cannot be made by mixing other colors
•Secondary color—a color that can be created by mixing two primary colors

Supplies Needed
•Transparent, colored discs (homemade)*
•3 water bottles
•3 clear cups
•Water
•Food coloring
•Marker
•Colored salt dough
•Bags to send dough home in

Mixing Colors Lesson

Colored water, ready for the activity

Large Group Activities
•Talk about colors with partially transparent, colored discs
•Compile a list of students’ favorite colors
•Demonstrate mixing colors by overlapping colored discs
•Read Mouse Paint
•Put out 3 water bottles, filled with water, add red, yellow and blue food coloring to create primary colors
•Allow students to make predictions about what will happen when water from two bottles is combined.
•Pour water into clear cups to mix colors
•Discuss mixing colors with students

Mixing Colors Lesson

Talking about the primary colors

Mixing Colors Lesson

Showing the mixed colors

Mixing Colors Lesson

Isaiah loved mixing colors

Table Time Activity
•Talk about mixing colors
•Hand out 6 balls salt dough to each student, 2 balls of each primary color
•Talk students through mixing a pair of colors to create another color, then allow students to finish mixing the colors together
•Give students time to play with the salt dough before putting it in bags to take home

Mixing Colors Lesson

The three primary colors, along with the secondaries that we created by mixing two colors

*I made my transparent circles by printing red, blue and yellow circles on a transparency sheet.

**Pictures are from doing the activities at home with Isaiah

Categories: Homeschool, Lesson Plans, Science, Sensory Play | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Science Fun–Volcanos

My brother, DJ, decided it would be fun to introduce Isaiah to the concept of making a volcano today. Obviously, Isaiah is a bit young to understand what’s happening, but he loved watching the vinegar and baking soda explode into a foam. At this point in Isaiah’s life, one of my goals for school is to build a fascination for science. I want to make science fun and interesting so he will continue to be excited about it as he gets older. The next time DJ says “do you wanna try a science experiment??” Isaiah’s response will be a resounding “yes!!!

Science Experiment

''Okay... This is weird... Why are we doing this?''

Science Experiment

''Whoa! This is why we do science this young. This look is priceless!

Science Experiment

Touching

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Categories: Homeschool, Science | Leave a comment

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